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Kanom Pang Sang Kaya Bai Toey - Thai Pandan Custard Bread

One of the most popular Thai dessert you can find on street.

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Khao Moo Daeng & Moo Krob - Thai Red Bar-B-Q Pork over Rice with Sauce

Khao Moo Daeng & Moo Krob is normally served with hard boiled egg, cucumber, Chinese sausage and topping with the red sauce.

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Moo Satay - Thai Pork Satay

You can eat Moo Satay as snacks, appetizer, main course or even the left-over meal.

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Rad Nar Noodles - Rice Noodles with Gravy

“Rad” means pouring over or topping, and “Nar” means face or surface.

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I-Tim KraTi: Thai Coconut Ice Cream

I-Tim KraTi or Thai Style Coconut Ice Cream is the best treat for everyone on the sunny days in Thailand.

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SongKran at Phra PraDaeng District

A Thai-Raman tradition of celebrating SongKran Festival in Phra PraDaeng district, Samut Prakarn.

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Khao Chae - Rice Soaked in Cool Water

Khao means “Rice” and Chae means “to soak”. If you see anyone eating something like Rice Soup with Ice, that’s – “Khao Chae”, especially in summer time. In the reign of King Rama II, the recipe was adapted from a Mon dish to serve in the palace during summer time. Hence there was no ice, so they put cooked rice to soaked with rain water – mixed with jasmine and candle fume scented –  in earthen ware and left in the shade to keep it cool. The recipe was modified into the complex, multi-dish variety found nowadays. It’s also considered “Royal Thai Cuisine”. If you visit Bangkok in other season and love to try some Khao Chae, there’re 5 places you can still get khao chae in Bangkok after April. Enjoy your Khao Chae – a cooling Thai summer treat.

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KhaoNiao MaMuang - Sticky Rice with Mango

Basically, KhaoNiao means Sticky Rice and MaMuang means Mango. KhaoNiao MaMuang is one of the most popular Thai dessert.

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Boat Noodle

Boat Noodle or “KuaiTiao Ruea”, Noodle dish with strong flavor contains either beef or pork, dark soy sauce, pickled bean curd, bean sprouts, sweet basil leaves and some other spices. It’s normally served with meatballs and pig’s liver. One question-mark popping up on your forehead, why is it called Boat Noodle? Some shops even put a little boat on the cooking counter as a display. Taking a time machine back to the time there were plenty of canals in Bangkok. The original boat noodles were one man operational business. The multi-tasking vendors had to do all things, such as: paddling the boat, scalding the noodles, seasoning the soup, serving the dish, getting paid, and cleaning dishes. So if dishes were too big, that would be problems: handling to customers, more cleaning task and more space needed. That’s why Boat Noodle always served in small bowls. For newbies, the Boat Noodle soup is called “Nam Tok” (means WaterFall), which is mixed by cow (or pigs) blood and salt. It may be too dark, but it’s very tasty. Just like any other Thai Street Foods, you can find Boat Noodles everywhere from street vendors, franchised shop in shopping malls to luxury dining places. […]

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Bang Kachao - The Green Lungs of Bangkok

Bangkok’s packed with 8 Millions people in 1,568.7 square kilometres (605.7 sq mi). It’s occupied by financial, business, social, culture and entertainment activities. There are not enough green space in Bangkok to breath.

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